So What If It’s Cold Outside, Baby   Leave a comment

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If you’re offended by “Baby It’s Cold Outside” you’re going to have a tough go of it in life. And so are your kids.

First, you are completely ignoring the fact that the song is 74 years old–when women were ladies and men were gentlemen.
Her “protest” was typical of a way a lady would speak to a man instead of just downing some drinks and hopping into bed with him.
No one seems offended by that, but you hear that crap on the radio ALL YEAR LONG.
Men actually had to court women back in those days, a subtle dance that for both men and women no longer exists. Sad but true.

Secondly, “what’s in this drink?” does not imply that she was roofied, or at least it didn’t in 1944. Get a grip.
She’s obviously deflecting her indecision toward her drink, which again, came with the times. She was not being drugged.
(Should we stop watching The Wizard of Oz because when they fall asleep in the poppy fields that means Dorothy is on heroin?)

Moreover, what are you worried is going to happen?? That people will hear this song, completely misinterpret the lyrics (as you obviously have) and then decide to go date rape someone?

Or maybe you’re worried about your children and what they will think when they hear it? Gee, maybe it’s the perfect teachable moment to actually sit down and have a conversation with your child about how men and women USED to be. Most notably, NOT offended by every stinking thing that crossed their path.

Yes, I agree, Rudolph gets bullied in the animated version of “Rudolph The Red Nosed Reindeer.” Aaaaand?? Wasn’t that the point of the whole story??
It’s the ultimate story of redemption and turning the other cheek and doing what you gotta do in the face of adversity.
He was called a bunch of names by his peers but shook it off and guided Santa’s sleigh anyway–in the fog no less!
Is there a better or more stoic way to flip a red nosed middle finger at some jealous reindeer?

What if Rudolph was just offended and cried and sulked off and went to his room and that was the end of the story? A really stupid story, that’s what.

Last but not least, have you seen violent video games or watched modern TV or listened to modern radio?
And you’re still worried about a 74 year old Christmas song? Have you lost your mind!?

If you are still offended by these things, good. BE OFFENDED.
But please don’t imply that the rest of us lack morals or good judgement, especially when it comes to parenting.

If you want to raise your kids to be on the lookout and offended at every little thing that they might not understand or agree with, have at it.
Me and my kids will be watching Rudolph when it’s cold outside.

Posted December 10, 2018 by sotpyouth in Uncategorized

I Went To a Strip Club   Leave a comment

This so important to let soak in. We are all proud of how we serve, and most of serve well. But we serve in our comfort zones  (Chief of sinners, though I be). When was the last time we pushed ourselves outside of where our comfort lies to help someone? This article hit me – People who need to hear the gospel and feel love, real love,  don’t because we’re uncomfortable with what we have to do or where we have to go to love. Please read this and let it soak in… Greg

strip club– By Anna Dimmel http://www.justajesusfollower.com

A while back I was asked by a group of pastor’s wives to go with them to strip clubs.

That sentence alone sounds strange. But hang with me.

At first I was a little hesitant. And not for reasons you might think.

I love people. Especially ones who are broken; it’s part of my purpose. But, given what I’ve walked through, I know how fragile hurting people can be.

And I know how insensitive the church can be.

And I was uneasy.

But, these weren’t just any pastors wives.

They had a vision.

One that longed to love on women that society had thrown aside.

It reminded me a lot of Jesus.

So, I jumped on it.

Their plan was to visit these clubs once a month to deliver a meal, gift baskets and confidential STD tests assistance. I joined them the first night and I’ll be honest, I had NO IDEA what to expect.

Now, I had my fair share of time (back in the day) in bars and such, but I’d never been to a strip club. I was totally unaware of what I was walking into.

We arrived and the bouncer ushered us back into the dressing room where we introduced ourselves and began distributing the gifts and food.

I was shocked by what I saw.

And I’ll tell you why:

I was raised to believe that no good comes from places like that. Which is probably true on many levels. (I wouldn’t suggest making it your go-to for date nights)

But, I was filled (as were many church kids) with fear about “places like that”. That “those people” were heathens and doing all kinds of sinful, shameful things.

Which, again, is true of strip clubs.

And bars.

And many other places.

Even churches.

But, these girls – these lovely, girls – were so…..normal.

As I talked with one in particular, she reminded me of any young mom I’d talk to in the school pick up line.

Minus the fact that she didn’t have much clothing on – I tried not to focus on that.

(Oh dear God, she’s talking about strippers in a Christian blog and talking about them being half naked. We should not EVEN be thinking such things! First, my sweet friend, it’s okay to laugh. Like seriously, it’s OKAY. The fact that 4 pastors wives and their pregnant friend even went into a strip club is kinda funny. If you’re going to love like Jesus, you’re going to find yourself in some pretty awkward situations. And if you don’t have a sense of humor, you’re toast. Like seriously. So, I give you full permission to go ahead and laugh at the mental picture) 🙂

They showed pictures of their children, talked of pregnancy (I was pregnant at the time) chatted about trying to get back in shape after having a baby, etc. It was SO NORMAL.

But, as we talked and I looked into their eyes, I saw women – young, broken women. Who had stories, probably much like mine or yours.

We didn’t stay long. They had a shift to work, and we didn’t want to overstay our welcome.

But, as we left, they thanked us.

More than once.

As I drove home, I totally fell apart in my car.

Not because I felt sorry for them. Not because I thought I was so much better than they were. Not because I pitied their circumstance.

I cried because my heart was broken.

One thing God continues to do in my heart, is humble it. Like over and over. Countless times, I think I’m going in to love on some lowly soul and then I walk out, completely undone because the condition of my own heart was exposed.

I wept in my car – realizing the way I had viewed women in that profession.

Because, people – that could have been me.

It could have been any of us.

Had my journey taken a few different turns, I very well could have been on the receiving end of that encounter.

Man. I WAS WRECKED.

I had my baby shortly after that visit and didn’t get to go back for the monthly visits to see the women.

But, I stayed in contact with one of the women organizing it and every so often, I ask her how it’s going.

They have been visiting them for a year now and received permission to leave a prayer box where the women could leave prayer requests.

The first few times they collected the box it had silly things written in it.

But they continued to leave it there.

Over the following weeks and months (as they continued to love on these women), the prayer requests got real.

Real situations

Real hurt

Real needs

Last time my friend and I got together, I asked about the strip clubs and this is what she said:

Her eyes always, always fill with tears when we talk about it because God is SO in love with these precious women.

She said, “The women are starting to reach out more. I’ve been texting with one and getting to connect with her a bit deeper”

We talked a bit more and she turned to me and said something that I am  still rattled by.

“You know what one of them said to me last time?”

“What?”

“She said that she was so glad we come to visit them because we’re not like the other churches”

I said, “what did she mean by that?”

She said, “Apparently other churches send them hate mail. ALL THE TIME”

I’m sure my face turned three shades of white.

Complete shock and disbelief gripped me.

We both looked at eachother and about fell into a pool of tears right there.

People – church –  WHAT ARE WE DOING?!

Did we forget (or do we just sing it songs) that Jesus was a friend of sinners, the outcast, the lonely?

Did we forget that it’s God’s kindness that leads us to love others?

That ALL OF OUR GOOD BIBLE LOVING STUFF are like filthy rags without love?

Jesus was UNAFRAID of walking in love to the least of the least.

Like the scum of the scum.

He walked right in, sat down and ate with the outcasts of society.

Gross, ugly messy people.

And the religious HATED HIM FOR IT.

A few years ago, I met with another pastor’s wife across the country who shared with me a similar ministry, although after months of developing relationships with the dancers, they asked the owners a crazy question.

They asked to hold a Bible study.

IN THE STRIP CLUB.

Just for the dancers.

Surprisingly, they were given a yes.

(Something about it building morale in the employees, but whatever. It was a surprising yes and they were thrilled)

So, they started leading a Bible study in the club.

But, something was missing.

And those serving knew it.

The women they were ministering to needed to be led by a man – not because these women were incapable, but because of the damaged, skewed image they had of men. They needed to see a man who was safe – they needed a man who loved like Jesus.

This woman’s husband (who was a pastor) stepped up and took on the challenge. And, for months the dancers wouldn’t even look him in the eye.

But he kept showing up….

Soon, one by one, the women met a divine love through this pastor’s humble, gentle leadership.

There was prayer.

Women found freedom.

And many went on to lead, healthy restored lives.

All because this group of women and this pastor were unafraid to go where God’s love was leading them.

I’m not suggesting that we all have this purpose.

I am not God.

What I AM saying to you is that if Jesus were here, walking among us, wouldn’t it be just like him to walk into the most un-religious place (strip club or whatever) and completely freak the religious folk out?

Just a thought.

He loved then.

He loves now.

But, he can only reach as far as you and I are willing to go.

Hugs,

Anna

 

Posted May 5, 2018 by sotpyouth in Uncategorized

New Studies Compare Smartphones to Cocaine Addiction   Leave a comment

Image result for smartphone addiction

By Elements Behavioral Healthposted on July 17, 2017
Are you a teenager or young adult in need of smartphone rehab? The answer appears to be “yes” for more than 30% of American and British teenagers who find it difficult to disconnect from their smartphones or other electronics.
In fact, technology addiction treatment programs are becoming more readily available to help people whose smartphone addictions, also known as “iPhone addictions, have taken over their lives, leading them to disengage from school, work, real social interaction and healthy activities like exercise and enjoyment of the outdoors.

Hooked on Your Smartphone

For people who are hooked on their smartphones or digital tablets, engaging on Snapchat and Instagram or other social media platforms and playing video games become their primary sources of social interaction and entertainment. Signs of a problem? When digital behavior becomes so obsessive that it interferes with life because the person finds it difficult to cease digital activities to join family at the dinner table or do things they would previously have enjoyed, such as going swimming, attending the cinema to see a movie or heading out to meet up with friends. When these signs appear, it is time to seek treatment for what is known as a behavioral process addiction.

Research Confirms That Smartphone Addiction Is Real

Researchers from the University of Maryland’s International Centre for Media and the Public Agenda and collaborating institutions conducted a study titled “The World Unplugged,” for which college-student volunteers at 12 universities around the world were asked to spend 24 hours without access to computers, mobile phones, iPods, television, radio and even newspapers. The aim was to see if the so-called “Net Generation” of digitally connected teens and young adults would experience something akin to withdrawal symptoms when disconnected from the Internet, computer games and social networking.
The study findings revealed that when not allowed to check their texts or emails, or connect to digital technology in any way, participants developed withdrawal symptoms typically seen in people addicted to cigarettes or other substances. Many study participants said they felt like they were trying to kick a hard drug habit or going on a strict diet. This condition has been described by experts as Information Deprivation Disorder.
Other studies and surveys confirm that Information Deprivation Disorder, or technology addiction, causes neurological complications, psychological disturbances and social problems.

How Smartphone Addiction Is Like Cocaine Addiction

When a person uses the stimulant cocaine, it affects the central nervous system, including the brain. It stimulates neurotransmitter receptors in the brain’s reward center with a huge surge of dopamine — an organic feel-good chemical, or neurotransmitter. This release of dopamine is much more abundant than normal, giving the user a rapid rush of energy and sensation of pleasure that radiates through their nervous system. This rewarding pleasure leads them to desire more cocaine so they can sustain or repeat the sensation. The desire for more can lead to addiction in a relatively short time.
In a similar way, smartphones and other technological devices can become addictive because they activate this same neurological reflex: Whenever a person receives a timely response to a text or an Instagram post, they feel a surge of pleasure and reward — the neurotransmitter receptors in the brain’s reward center release dopamine and make them feel good. If they repeat this behavior — compulsively posting messages or sending texts and receiving the “reward” of instant responses — their dopamine levels rise even higher and their brains send the message that this is a good activity. They don’t want to stop, or find it increasingly difficult to tear themselves away from their digital world.
As with cocaine, continued overuse of digital technology can lead to smartphone addiction. Treatment may be necessary to stop the compulsive, addictive behavior and regain a healthier lifestyle with a return to healthy activities.

Sources

New Study By Merrill Professor Finds Students Everywhere Addicted to Media. Philip Merrill College of Journalism, University of Maryland, 2011.
https://merrill.umd.edu/2011/04/new-merrill-study-finds-students-everywhere-addicted-to-media/
http://www.telegraph.co.uk/technology/news/8235302/Facebook-generation-suffer-information-withdrawal-syndrome.html
The Relationship between Mental Health and Addiction to Mobile Phones among University Students of Shahrekord, Iran. Nasim Hedayati, PhD, et al. Addiction Health, 2014.
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4354213/
Internet Addiction: A Brief Summary of Research and Practice. Hilarie Cash, et al. Current Psychiatry Reviews, 2012. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3480687/
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3480687/#
Children as young as 13 attending ‘smartphone rehab’ as concerns grow over screen time. Katie Forster. The Independent, April 14, 2017.
http://www.independent.co.uk/news/health/teenage-technology-addiction-smartphone-rehab-seattle-clinic-children-aged-13-mobile-devices-a7684356.html
Giving your child a smartphone is like giving them a gram of cocaine, says top addiction expert. Rachel Pells. The Independent, June 7, 2017. http://www.independent.co.uk/news/education/education-news/child-smart-phones-cocaine-addiction-expert-mandy-saligari-harley-street-charter-clinic-technology-a7777941.html

Posted January 16, 2018 by sotpyouth in Uncategorized

What Do We Say To Our Children About The Las Vegas Shooting?   Leave a comment

Let me start off by saying there are so many more qualified people than me to dive deep into counseling youth who are deeply troubled (beyond normal, whatever normal is) by this tragedy and others of a similar nature.

Most of the following are  words of help and understanding from Fred Rogers:

Look For The Helpers – “When I was a boy and I would see scary things in the news, my mother would say to me, “Look for the helpers. You will always find people who are helping.” To this day, especially in times of “disaster,” I remember my mother’s words and I am always comforted by realizing that there are still so many helpers – so many caring people in this world.”

In these cases, young people are inevitably going to ask, “why would God let something like this happen”? For me (Greg), the answer will be “I’m not sure as I’m not God, and can’t speak in his place, but let’s look at all of the qualified people God put in that place to be able to help those in need”. You see, God is faithful to those who need his help.

Even if we wanted to, it would be impossible to give our children all the reasons for such things as war, terrorists, abuse, murders, major fires, hurricanes, and earthquakes. If they ask questions, our best answer may be to ask them, “What do you think happened?” If the answer is “I don’t know,” then the simplest reply might be something like, “I’m sad about the news, and I’m worried. But I love you, and I’m here to care for you.”
If we don’t let children know it’s okay to feel sad and scared, they may think something is wrong with them when they do feel that way. They certainly don’t need to hear all the details of what’s making us sad or scared, but if we can help them accept their own feelings as natural and normal, their feelings will be much more manageable for them.
Angry feelings are part of being human, especially when we feel powerless. One of the most important messages we can give our children is, “It’s okay to be angry, but it’s not okay to hurt ourselves or others.” Besides giving children the right to their anger, we can help them find constructive things to do with their feelings. This way, we’ll be giving them useful tools that will serve them all their life, and help them to become the worlds’ future peacemakers — the world’s future “helpers.”

Here are some helpful hints on helping young people during tragedies like this:

  • Do your best to keep the television off, or at least limit how much your child sees of any news event.
  • Try to keep yourself calm. Your presence can help your child feel more secure.
  • Give your child extra comfort and physical affection, like hugs or snuggling up together with a favorite book. Physical comfort goes a long way towards providing inner security. That closeness can nourish you, too.
  • Try to keep regular routines as normal as possible. Children and adults count on their familiar pattern of everyday life.
  • Plan something that you and your child enjoy doing together, like taking a walk, going on a picnic, having some quiet time, or doing something silly. It can help to know there are simple things in life that can help us feel better, in good times and in bad.
  • Even if children don’t mention what they’ve seen or heard in the news, it can help to ask what they think has happened. If parents don’t bring up the subject, children can be left with their misinterpretations. You may be really surprised at how much your child has heard from others.
  • Focus attention on the helpers, like the police, firemen, doctors, nurses, paramedics, and volunteers. It’s reassuring to know there are many caring people who are doing all they can to help others in this world.
  • Let your child know if you’re making a donation, going to a town meeting, writing a letter or e-mail of support, or taking some other action. It can help children to know that adults take many different active roles and that we don’t give in to helplessness in times of worldwide crisis.

Most importantly, don’t neglect the power of prayer. Pray for God to give you words to speak. Pray with your children to hear God’s voice in the midst of tragedy. Give God thanks and praise for providing helpers.

-Greg

Posted October 3, 2017 by sotpyouth in Uncategorized

A Sunday talk on sex, drugs, drinking and dying with the frat boys   Leave a comment

A Sunday talk on sex, drugs, drinking and dying with the frat boys

Published on September 17, 2017|Featured in: Best Advice, Careers: The Next Level, Education, Millennials, Social Impact
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Louis M. Profeta MDSign in to follow this author

Just an Emergency Physician at St. Vincent EM Physicians Inc., author, public speaker, but mostly a father and a husband

Most bowed their heads or held their hands across their mouths as I described how it would happen. I told them that they will awaken with the smell of shit filling their bedroom. The lights will probably be low and the shades pulled and, because they are just waking up, they might have trouble focusing their eyes, especially after a night of heavy partying.
“Damn it, Benny, did you fart or shit yourself?” they might yell out. “F.cking get out of here, you smell awful!”
Those are the words I told them that they might shout just before they flip on the lights or stumble out of bed and trip on the now blue and stiff body sporting a college T-shirt passed down from an older brother who graduated two years past.
Dead, waxy, with “rock-still” clouded eyes, you could never envision a stare so distant. You played pickup basketball yesterday at the campus rec center and Benny maybe hit one out of 10 threes. You blew him crap all day about it. Now, though, he is so still, laying among the pile of yet-to-be-washed clothes or wrapped up in a blanket on a piss-soaked IKEA futon delivered to him last week. You bought the TV and the coffee table. The top two drawers are yours.
“Think about it. Nobody gets up in the morning, brushes their teeth, combs their hair and says to themselves, ‘Today is the day I die,” I told them.
This was the second time I had given this talk — one I wish I could give to college students across the country as campuses now return to life. My son’s fraternity at Indiana University-Bloomington, a Big Ten school and my alma mater housed in limestone buildings in an impossibly picturesque college town, had invited me to sit in front of more than two dozen young men in the living room of their fraternity. It was the most beautiful of Sunday afternoons. They could have been doing anything else. They did not have to be here, but here they were.
So I walked them through it. I showed them how I would tell their mom and dad that they were dead and how mom would pull hunks of her hair out ‘til it bled and dad would punch the wall shattering a bone or two but not noticing, a river of snot pouring from his face. I described how his “brothers” from the frat would sit along the wall in the waiting room and sob. But, already, mom and dad would be blaming them for getting their kid drunk or stoned to the point puke bubbled up in his throat, then plugged his trachea, choking him just as surely as if they had taken their foot and crushed their child’s windpipe on their own.
“They will blame you for their child’s death until the day you die. Are you ready for that?” I asked.
They sat silent, not wanting to look up.
I spent a few minutes pretending to breathe like someone asleep under the influence of a large amount of alcohol or just a few sedatives but who was at real risk of aspirating vomit into their lungs, or choking on their own tongue as it falls to the back of their mouth. You could tell from the look on their faces they all knew someone who once breathed like that after passing out drunk and now they were wondering how close they might have come, how close.
I challenged them with how absolutely idiotic it was for them to think that, just because they had perhaps taken a first-aid class or read a what-to-do-with-a-drunk-friend primer on the internet they somehow now had the skill set to “monitor” a friend who passed out after the fifth vodka slammer.
“We use well-trained nurses, paramedics, sophisticated pulse oximetry and cardiac monitoring in our ER to assess these patients, not some pledge vying to become a ‘brother.’”
And they listened, and they listened intently. You could tell they wanted to know, and each one knew they needed to know.
“If you drink to the point that you do not have control of your faculties you are an idiot. If you encourage someone to get to that point you are an asshole and certainly no brother. Friends don’t do that. It takes one little mistake to ruin your life or someone else’s life forever.” The room stayed quiet for a bit, but you could tell they wanted to ask more questions.
“You guys have a chance to ask me anything you want. You’ve got an ER doc who practices in a level I trauma center and who is on the board of directors of a major metropolitan city crime lab standing right in front of you. What do you want to know?”
And the hands finally went up — I should have known better; you could tell they needed a bit of a break.
“What about Viagra, is it safe for people our age?” Nervous laughter erupted.
“Son, which part of erection lasting more than six hours don’t you understand?”
“Doc, that’s the whole point.”
“You’re 21 and in college. You have Tinder for God’s sake. If you can’t get an erection now, you’ve got a hell of a lot bigger problems than are fixable with Viagra. Besides, you know what we have to do for an erection lasting six hours? It’s called priapism and its treatment involves two large needles…” A collective groan of thirty men a few years removed from puberty filled the room.
“What about Red Bull?” another hand shot up.
“It’s just a boatload of caffeine; I’ve never understood mixing it with vodka. I guess if you like the taste, but what’s the point of mixing a stimulant and a sedative? Seems like a waste of good vodka to me, but I feel the same about Jack and Coke. It’s too easy to drink too much. Just…think about maybe not.”
“What about Ativan?”
“Mix it with alcohol of any kind and you got a decent chance of dying. Why do you need to pass out? What the hell are you doing with it anyway? That’s just stupid. If you are going to have a few drinks, then do that. If you are going to smoke some weed…well that’s one thing, but don’t fuck with prescription or non-prescription medications.”
“Can you tell us about cocaine”
“Yeah, use it once and you can die of a heart attack or have a stroke then you can spend the rest of your life in a nursing home with a feeding tube poking out of your stomach, in a diaper, limbs contracted, getting huge bed sores and urine infections. You are out of your f.cking mind if you use that. The same goes with heroin. You stand a good chance of dying or ending up brain damaged with even one single use. You guys need to kick out of your house anyone ever caught doing that shit. It’s horribly addictive, life-destroying garbage. I have never, ever met a person that was glad they started using it…even once. And you are now one degree of separation away from the worst criminal element on earth.”
“What about vaping.”
“It’s better than smoking.”
“What about Adderall?”
“It’s a stimulant too, it’s an amphetamine, you know like meth.”
“Yeah but nobody does that here…”
“Bullshit, pal.” I interrupted and snapped back. “This is the Midwest. Memphis has barbecue. We make meth. Besides you probably don’t have ADD; just try sleeping earlier, on occasion open a book and pay attention for a change.” More than a few snickered.
And we talked a bit about sexual assault and what they never, ever envisioned, and it became quiet again.
“Do you honestly think you would ever know or find out if one of your ‘brothers’ had been raped or sodomized? Do you honestly think that guys confide in anyone other than us in the ER that this has happened? You don’t think for one minute that if you follow some girl home and get passed-out drunk, some other guy or ex-boyfriend might not use your intoxicated state to seek revenge, humiliate you, soil your face, photograph you? You don’t think we see that?”
You could tell that it had never crossed their minds, but I’ve seen it.
And we talked more about women.
“You asked me here because you want to do the right thing; make the right choices. When it comes to women under the influence, don’t go there. Don’t sleep with them because no matter what, one of you may regret it and the reality is, they…will…not…believe…you. I don’t care if it was consensual. They will not believe you. Besides you all have moms or sisters that you respect. Me, I don’t have daughters, but if I did, I’d probably hate all you out of my own irrational fear as a father. If you are not absolutely sure she consents, then don’t have sex with her. It’s not worth it and it simply is not right. Be men, not animals.”
We talked some more, about other drugs and prevailing dangers of their time.
“I’m not here to preach about all the evils of sex, weed and alcohol to you. I’m not going to tell you to abstain, but just some food for thought. Studies clearly show though that your long-term earning potential will be less if you smoke weed on a regular basis. For that reason alone, I’d probably think twice, unless of course your lifelong dream is to always work for someone else. Weed typically doesn’t open doors in your life. Drink, but think about perhaps not getting drunk. Have sex, but have responsible sex based on mutual understanding and respect. If you have to think about whether or not it’s the right thing to do, then it’s the wrong thing to do. Doing the right thing is simply not that confusing. It may be hard to do, but it’s not that confusing.”
“I’m a parent,” I said, as I motioned to my child who seemed proud that I was there and I was proud that he asked me. “I want you to have a great college experience that helps prepare you for a long, healthy and happy future. We understand each other?” They nodded. “You can always call me or one of my partners, or go to any ER in America if you need help or are scared or confused or worried or lost. Don’t make me go into that quiet room, kneel in front of your mother and tell her you’re dead…please.” They all nodded one final time.
And I could tell, on this sunny Sunday afternoon, that they were listening and that what I said mattered to them and it gave me hope. It gave me hope.
Dr. Louis M. Profeta is an emergency physician practicing in Indianapolis. He is one of LinkedIn’s Top Voices and the author of the critically acclaimed book, The Patient in Room Nine Says He’s God.
Feedback at louermd@att.net is welcomed.

Posted September 18, 2017 by sotpyouth in Uncategorized

What Happens in an Internet Minute in 2016?   Leave a comment

Jeff Desjardins

on April 25, 2016 at 10:52 am

Last week, we published U.S. consumption numbers in real-time, highlighting the speed at which physical goods and services are purchased.

Today, we enter into the digital realm to see what happens every minute on the internet. The statistics are mind-boggling and put in perspective how scalable platforms have taken over the world:

The above infographic shows how truly important the element of scale is to business today.

Google literally processes 2.4 million searches every minute. In that same span of time, 700,000 people login to Facebook and Amazon sells over $200,000 of physical and digital goods.

Platforms such as the ones listed above are comparable in magnitude to other mega-sized companies, but without the intense capital expenditures, debt, or hard costs. That’s why Alphabet, Google’s parent company, can spend over a billion dollars each year on “moonshots”, and why Facebook’s stock is up 35.6% over the last 52 weeks.

Here are the full stats on what happens every internet minute:

  • 701,389 logins on Facebook
  • 69,444 hours watched on Netflix
  • 150 million emails sent
  • 1,389 Uber rides
  • 527,760 photos shared on Snapchat
  • 51,000 app downloads on Apple’s App Store
  • $203,596 in sales on Amazon.com
  • 120+ new Linkedin accounts
  • 347,222 tweets on Twitter
  • 28,194 new posts to Instagram
  • 38,052 hours of music listened to on Spotify
  • 1.04 million vine loops
  • 2.4 million search queries on Google
  • 972,222 Tinder swipes
  • 2.78 million video views on Youtube
  • 20.8 million messages on WhatsApp

That’s a lot of data every minute, and this volume of information is part of the reason that these same companies are prioritizing the ability to process and interpret big data more than ever before.

Original graphic by: Excelacom

Posted April 5, 2017 by sotpyouth in Uncategorized

The Letter I Wrote To My Teenage Son About Drinking   Leave a comment

Parents,

This is such an important reminder that we have the responsibility to make sure that our kids know the importance of following the law (as well as parents following the law to not provide alcohol to those under 21). I know this may sound harsh, but I find it completely ridiculous that there are weak parents out there who give up and take on the attitude that kids are going to it, so I might as well let them do it at home. What message are we sending our kids? That it’s ok to break the laws we wish to break? Instead, we need to let our kids know that we value them and their safety and health, and that in no way is it acceptable to drink alcohol until they are of legal age.

God has entrusted us to care for and love our children in the best way we can. That is our most important job!

Parents – Stand strong! Don’t compromise your values. Talk to your kids. Don’t give in.

For those parents who have given in – It’s not too late. You’re the parent. Tell your kids you’ve changed your mind and why.

A mom writes a letter about underage drinking and reminds her son of the family values that she holds dear. 

As hard as it is for me to believe this, I’m the mother of a teenager. In fact Tom will be entering 10th grade this September.

The years have gone so fast that I really feel as if one day I was taking pictures of him graduating from our Mommy and Me class, the next day I couldn’t believe he was in the fourth grade, and then bang, he was in high school.

Play dates at friends houses have been replaced by going out for sushi, a movie, or walking around town with his buddies. Alone. No adults watching over them.

Instead of chatting with his friends’ parents over coffee at kitchen tables, we wave to them out of car windows.

A parent discusses drinking alcohol with her teen

The times they are a changin.

Whenever my family or friends ask about Tom and marvel at the fact that he is now a teenager, the subject of alcohol and drugs always seems to come up. As in, how will I handle it when he comes home drunk for the first time? Or what will I do if I find out that he had been using drugs?

[More on binge drinking and the impact on teenage brains here.]

I always find the questions a bit baffling because it’s just assumed that Tom will try these things. In fact the common answer I get from most of my friends and family is that of course he will.

Truth be told, I find this mindset maddening. And if I was a kid today, I would find it really confusing.

From the time Tom was in kindergarten, he has been learning in school that drinking and drugs are dangerous choices. He has read books and been shown movies about how alcohol can affect your judgment and make it easier to engage in other risky behaviors like unprotected sex or driving under the influence.

In eighth grade his health teacher made the whole class write letters addressed to themselves making the promise that they won’t smoke, drink, or have unprotected sex in high school.

Yet so many parents take it as a foregone conclusion that their kids will engage in any manner of risky behavior.

I’ve been accused of living in “La La Land” if I think otherwise. “Kids will be kids,” some say. Others will chime in with, “after all we did it.”

[More on the argument for tolerating teenage drinking here.]

Really? Is this the criteria we are going to base our parenting on?

I get it. My son is growing up, and he’s going to have to make choices for himself.

I want him to spread his wings and discover who he is. And as much as some people think I’m living under a rock, I do know that he is going to make mistakes along the way.

But, I want him to know where I stand on engaging in behaviors that are at best risky and at worst illegal or life threatening.

I never want my son to say that I wasn’t clear about my feelings — so I’m writing them out here, for all to see.

Dear Tom,

The legal drinking age in this country is 21. Please know that Dad and I will never allow you to have alcohol in our house or in our presence until you reach that age. Please also know that no good has ever come from a group of teenagers drinking. It’s a recipe for all kinds of disasters.

If you should choose to drink, you’ll not only be breaking the rules of our house, you’ll be breaking the law.

If you get stopped for driving under the influence, or the police get called to a party where you have been drinking, you may be in a position where we can’t protect you.

Always call me and your dad. ALWAYS. No matter what you have done.

Don’t ever follow up a bad choice with one that’s worse just because you’re afraid of disappointing us or making us angry.

Will we be happy? Of course not. But we would much rather get you and any friend that wants to come with you home safely, then get a call that you are NEVER coming home.

Let me be clear that the fact that we love you and will stand by you does not in any way mean we will stand by while you do things that you know aren’t good for you.

There will be those who will tell you that your parents are being unreasonable and totally unrealistic. Some may tell you that you are a teenager and that it’s a rite of passage to get drunk. They may even regale you with stories of their own youthful mistakes.

Listen to your own heart and trust your gut. Also know there is nothing cool about waking up in your own vomit, or having a DUI before you are 18.

Your father and I are so proud of the man you are becoming. We love you so much that we don’t care if you hate us. That’s our gift to you, we are your parents not your friends.

Always,

Mom

This post originally appeared on My Dishwasher’s Possessed! 

Related:

Teen Brain: What Parents Need to Know

Clean is Sexy and 58 Other Bits of Advice for Young Men

Dear Mom of High School Sophomore 

kathy-head-shot

Kathy Radigan is a writer, blogger, social media addict, mom to three, wife to one and owner of a possessed appliance. She posts a weekly essay each Sunday on her blog, My dishwasher’s possessed!Kathy is a Huffington Post blogger and a frequent contributor to What the Flicka and Scary Mommy.. Her work has also been featured on, Yahoo, Elephant Journal, What to Expect,and other online publications. Kathy lives outside New York City with her family. You can follow her on  Facebook, Twitter

Posted November 14, 2016 by sotpyouth in Drugs/Alcohol, Family

Facts & Dreams

"Each man should frame life so that at some future hour fact and his dreaming meet." -Victor Hugo